Veteran’s Special

Brain Training of New England Veterans.jpg

In honor of all our Veteran’s, their hard work and devotion to our country, I’m offering a discount on brain training services.  Suffering from head trauma?  PTSD?  Headaches or nightmares?  Sleep or temper problems?  Neurofeedback is an evidence-based practice that heals the problem from the inside out.  Get your life back on track.

Click on the “Schedule Now” button.  Schedule a series of 10 sessions of Neurofeedback and you’ll get a big discount.  I’ll work with you to make this affordable and give you a fast track to feeling better.  Looking forward being part of your healing team.

The Brain Lady,

Pam

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Parietal lobes

Parietal lobe.jpgCan you read and write? Do math? Put on your shoes? Read a map? Apply lipstick or know when someone is unhappy? Catch a ball?

If so, thank your Parietal lobes!!!

  • The parietal lobe is complex in that there is a dominant hemisphere and a non-dominant hemisphere. The parietal lobe controls abilities such as math calculation, writing, left-right orientation, and finger recognition. Lesions in part of the parietal lobe can cause deficits in writing, arithmetic calculation, left-right disorientation, and finger-naming (Gerstmann syndrome).
  • The nondominant parietal lobe controls the opposite side of the body enabling you to be aware of environmental space, and is important for abilities such as drawing, being aware of expression, body language and facial recognition. If you can recognize feelings on someone’s face, be grateful to your parietal lobe near the temporal lobe. .An acute injury to the nondominant parietal lobe may cause neglect of the contralateral side (usually the left), resulting in decreased awareness of that part of the body, its environment, and any associated injury to that side (anosognosia). For example, patients with large right parietal lesions may deny the existence of left-sided paralysis. Patients with smaller lesions may lose the ability to do learned motor tasks (eg, dressing, other well-learned activities)—a spatial-manual deficit called apraxia.

Parietal lobe functions include:

  • Cognition
  • Information Processing
  • Touch Sensation (Pain, Temperature, etc.)
  • Understanding Spatial Orientation
  • Movement Coordination
  • Speech
  • Visual Perception
  • Reading and Writing
  • Mathematical Computation

Training with Neurofeedback can assist the brain in making new pathways and support the brain in rewiring itself. Schedule your free demo today to learn more about how Neurofeedback can bring you to a higher state of awareness and function. For the first time in history, we can see our own brains at work and assist its functioning to a higher state of optimization.

I look forward to working with you!

Your Frontal Lobe

Where is it?  It’s the front and top of your head


FRONTAL LOBE BTNE

What does it do?  This part of the brain handles thinking, decision- making, and planning.
You use your frontal lobe nearly everyday. You use it to make decisions, such as what to eat or drink for breakfast in the morning.   It’s where you make a plan for your day, and concentrate on your “To Do” list.  It’s where your personality is formed and why when a person has an accident or injury to the frontal lobe people notice a change to a person’s personality.

Here is a little neuroscience history:

In the mid 1800s, Phineas Gage, a railroad worker, somehow miraculously survived an accident where a large iron pole was driven into his head, specifically into the frontal lobe. After the incident, Gage’s personality was said to have changed dramatically.  His friends and family said that the once kind and hard-working Gage had changed into a lazy and rude man until he died years later. However, this incident allowed doctors and psychologists to analyze the brain and see the importance and functions of the frontal lobe.

 

 

Neurofeedback for ADD

Simply stated, brainwave biofeedback, also called neurofeedback, is the direct training of the brain to stay more calm and focused without medication.

Over the past 30 years, many clinicians have reported the effectiveness of this totally natural and non-invasive process for treating ADD.  In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics named neurofeedback a “Level 1: “Best Support” Intervention for ADD on par with medication” in 2012.

For parents who are wary about using a single approach (such as medication alone) to treat their child’s ADD, neurofeedback is a welcome alternative; offering benefits that continue to persist well beyond each treatment session, with zero negative side effects.

How it Works:

  1. Electrodes are placed on the scalp, measuring the number and type of brain wave patterns; in particular, theta and beta waves.

There are 5 main types:

  • delta waves: very slow brain waves, seen mostly during sleep
  • theta waves: slow brain waves, seen during daydreaming and twilight states
  • alpha waves: brain waves seen during relaxed states
  • SMR (sensorimotor rhythm) waves: brain waves seen during states of focused relaxation
  • beta waves: fast brain waves seen during concentration or mental work states
  1. The patient—child, teen, or adult—is asked to play games with their minds using a computer screen.
  1. The computer feeds back to the patient the type of brain wave activity it’s monitoring.
  1. When the brain responds the way it’s supposed to, the computer software rewards the patient (on screen).
  1. If the patient gets distracted, the computer responds by the game or movie stopping, letting the patient know that they need to relax or focus more.

Lasting Results:

Over time, people with ADD can literally train their brains to become more active, naturally!

Neurofeedback is powerful, in part, because the patient becomes an active part of their healing by gaining more control over his or her own physiological processes.

In our experience with neurofeedback and ADD, many people are able to:

  • Improve their reading skills and decrease their need for medication.
  • Decrease their impulsivity and aggressiveness.
  • Improve the quality of their sleep.

Of course, neurofeedback is not an overnight cure.  People will often need to do 30 to 40 sessions to see a significant benefit, and this is very individual.  I will work with you or your child to get to lasting results quickly.

Learn more about neurofeedback strategies for each type of ADD in Dr. Amen’s new book, Healing ADD: The Breakthrough Program that Allows You to See and Heal the 7 Types of ADD.  Call today to schedule your free demonstration of Neurofeedback at the Brain Training of New England Center in Kittery, Maine.

Neurofeedback andADD/ADHD

Can neurofeedback treat the symptoms of ADD and ADHD without medication?

shutterstock_106369628 [Converted]People with ADD/ADHD can display a variety of symptoms and may appear to be distracted, impulsive, and inattentive. However, ADD/ADHD is not a psychological problem – it’s a brain problem and often treated with medication when brain training can be a better, more healthy alternative.

Medications do not teach a person to cope long-term, and are accompanied by side effects such as:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Sleep difficulties
  • Potential cardiac risks
  • Personality changes

Moreover, children with more significant ADD or ADHD may not gain much benefit from medications or behavioral interventions. People can also develop a tolerance to medications over time, resulting in increased dosages, additional medications, and potentially more side effects.

The long-term effects of ADD/ADHD medications are largely unknown. Ritalin, very often prescribed for the treatment of ADD and ADHD, has been used to treat ADD/ADHD since the 1960’s but still has not been studied for long-term effects. In fact, the Canadian Medical Association asserts:

shutterstock_104286563[W]hile research has conclusively proven Ritalin’s short-term effectiveness, little is known about the long-term efficacy and safety of a drug that some children take for many years. In fact, the average duration of randomized trials of the drug is 3.3 weeks…. There aren’t long-term studies, and that’s of some concern because we don’t know whether the initial positive effects… might diminish over time. Moreover, we don’t know what happens to the side-effects… whether those got worse or maybe they diminish too – we don’t really know.

Unlike medication, neurofeedback actually retrains the brain, resulting in significant improvement in ADHD/ADD symptoms. With neurofeedback, people learn to make long-term improvements in self-control and attention because their brain learns to make healthier patterns.

Training the brain with neurofeedback helps to address the root of the problem without medications by helping create a healthier brain.

Why is neurofeedback so effective for ADD/ADHD?

If a stimulant literally speeds someone up, why is it prescribed for someone with hyperactivity problems? Why do stimulants seem to help someone with ADD/ADHD slow down and focus?

In a person with ADD or ADHD, the areas of the brain that control attention and focus may have too much slow activity, which can also lead to feeling depressed, worried, and unmotivated. Unconsciously, people with ADD/ADHD increase body movements to stimulate and “wake” their brains. Therefore, stimulants are prescribed to increase brain activity without increasing body movement.

The problem with this strategy is that people with ADHD may already be experiencing too much rapid activity in some regions of the brain, which can lead to other problems like acting aggressively, impulsively, or feeling anxious. A person’s brain can race so fast that it is nearly impossible for them to sit still or listen. In fact, because people with ADD are often quite intelligent, they understand concepts quickly. Their fast mental pace may cause them to move ahead before all the instructions are given, causing them to miss crucial details.

Research shows that neurofeedback is a successful alternative for treatment of ADD/ADHD.

ADD and ADHD are brain problems. Neurofeedback allows people to work directly on the problem by training the brain to become calmer, more focused, and less impulsive. By reducing the too-fast and too-slow brain patterns that occur in the brain of someone with ADD or ADHD, neurofeedback helps the person learn how to take control.

According to health professionals who use neurofeedback in their practices, over 85% of clients with ADD or ADHD learn to increase focus, reduce impulsivity, and manage their behavior when they train with neurofeedback on a consistent basis.

Another reason that neurofeedback is so effective for ADHD and ADD is that it appeals to children – it seems just like a computer game! Instead of controlling the game with a mouse, the child “plays” the game with his or her brain. Children seem to enjoy brain training, making it easy to continue with treatment and achieve significant improvements.