Veteran’s Special

Brain Training of New England Veterans.jpg

In honor of all our Veteran’s, their hard work and devotion to our country, I’m offering a discount on brain training services.  Suffering from head trauma?  PTSD?  Headaches or nightmares?  Sleep or temper problems?  Neurofeedback is an evidence-based practice that heals the problem from the inside out.  Get your life back on track.

Click on the “Schedule Now” button.  Schedule a series of 10 sessions of Neurofeedback and you’ll get a big discount.  I’ll work with you to make this affordable and give you a fast track to feeling better.  Looking forward being part of your healing team.

The Brain Lady,

Pam

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Parietal lobes

Parietal lobe.jpgCan you read and write? Do math? Put on your shoes? Read a map? Apply lipstick or know when someone is unhappy? Catch a ball?

If so, thank your Parietal lobes!!!

  • The parietal lobe is complex in that there is a dominant hemisphere and a non-dominant hemisphere. The parietal lobe controls abilities such as math calculation, writing, left-right orientation, and finger recognition. Lesions in part of the parietal lobe can cause deficits in writing, arithmetic calculation, left-right disorientation, and finger-naming (Gerstmann syndrome).
  • The nondominant parietal lobe controls the opposite side of the body enabling you to be aware of environmental space, and is important for abilities such as drawing, being aware of expression, body language and facial recognition. If you can recognize feelings on someone’s face, be grateful to your parietal lobe near the temporal lobe. .An acute injury to the nondominant parietal lobe may cause neglect of the contralateral side (usually the left), resulting in decreased awareness of that part of the body, its environment, and any associated injury to that side (anosognosia). For example, patients with large right parietal lesions may deny the existence of left-sided paralysis. Patients with smaller lesions may lose the ability to do learned motor tasks (eg, dressing, other well-learned activities)—a spatial-manual deficit called apraxia.

Parietal lobe functions include:

  • Cognition
  • Information Processing
  • Touch Sensation (Pain, Temperature, etc.)
  • Understanding Spatial Orientation
  • Movement Coordination
  • Speech
  • Visual Perception
  • Reading and Writing
  • Mathematical Computation

Training with Neurofeedback can assist the brain in making new pathways and support the brain in rewiring itself. Schedule your free demo today to learn more about how Neurofeedback can bring you to a higher state of awareness and function. For the first time in history, we can see our own brains at work and assist its functioning to a higher state of optimization.

I look forward to working with you!

Your Frontal Lobe

Where is it?  It’s the front and top of your head


FRONTAL LOBE BTNE

What does it do?  This part of the brain handles thinking, decision- making, and planning.
You use your frontal lobe nearly everyday. You use it to make decisions, such as what to eat or drink for breakfast in the morning.   It’s where you make a plan for your day, and concentrate on your “To Do” list.  It’s where your personality is formed and why when a person has an accident or injury to the frontal lobe people notice a change to a person’s personality.

Here is a little neuroscience history:

In the mid 1800s, Phineas Gage, a railroad worker, somehow miraculously survived an accident where a large iron pole was driven into his head, specifically into the frontal lobe. After the incident, Gage’s personality was said to have changed dramatically.  His friends and family said that the once kind and hard-working Gage had changed into a lazy and rude man until he died years later. However, this incident allowed doctors and psychologists to analyze the brain and see the importance and functions of the frontal lobe.

 

 

Role of your Temporal Lobes

temporal lobe btne kittery

Clients often ask  me for more detailed descriptions of the lobes of the brain and their functions. For the next few Monday posts I’ll detail the different segments.

The temporal lobe is one of the four sections, or lobes, that make up the cerebral cortex of the brain. Located on the lower regions of both the left and right sides of the cortex (above and around the ears) , the temporal lobe is essential in processing sensory stimuli received from both the eyes and ears. It assists in coordinating speech and spatial navigation and contains the brain structures responsible for long-term memory. This is why when someone has a stroke over their left ear they often lose the power of language expression. Or a bonk to that area might have affected your memory or language processing.

Auditory Processing

  • The temporal lobe contains a section of the brain known as the primary auditory cortex. This region of the cortex is responsible for receiving and interpreting the information transmitted to it by auditory receptors (your hearing) . This part of the temporal lobe assists the brain in determining the location of a sound. While parts of other lobes in the brain play a role in auditory processing, the temporal lobe is the most important.

Speech

  • The temporal lobe located on the left side of the cerebral cortex is essential for speech. This left temporal lobe contains Wernicke’s area, a portion of the brain that is largely responsible for controlling the mental processing needed for speech, including comprehension and verbal memory.

Visual processing

  • The lowest portions of the temporal lobe are responsible for processing and interpreting information from the visual system, especially the most advanced types of visual memory. This portion of the temporal lobe contains the neural networks required for an individual to perceive and remember objects, faces and detailed settings and scenery.

Memory

  • The hippocampus is located in the temporal lobe; this structure is one of the most crucial parts of the cortex involved in long-term memory retention. The hippocampus is found not on the outer region of the cerebrum but within the actual lobe, and it allows an individual to retain new memories while storing older ones. These memories can be anything from facts learned by rote or memories of events that occurred in the past.

Spatial navigation

  • Portions of the temporal lobe, particularly the hippocampus, also play a large role in the ability of an individual to navigate spatially and to physically “remember” a place that the person has been before. People with a damaged hippocampus often get lost because their brains are unable to process, spatially, where they have been and where they are going.

Stay tuned to next week when I will write about the Parietal lobes.  Interesting stuff.  To get my weekly blog to your inbox, just press the follow this blog button.

Brain Waves Basic

Four simple periodic rhythms recorded in the EEG are alpha, beta, delta, and theta. These rhythms are identified by frequency (Hz or cycles/sec) and amplitude. The amplitudes recorded by scalp electrodes are in the range of microvolts (μV or 1/1,000,000 of a volt).

rhythm Freq (Hz) Amp(μV)
alpha 8-13 20-200
beta 13-30 5-10
delta 1-5 20-200
theta 4-8 10

Alpha: The four basic rhythms have been associated with various states. In general, the alpha rhythm is the prominent EEG wave pattern of an adult who is awake but relaxed with eyes closed. Each region of the brain had a characteristic alpha rhythm but alpha waves of the greatest amplitude are recorded from the occipital and parietal regions of the cerebral cortex. In general, amplitudes of alpha waves diminish when subjects open their eyes and are attentive to external stimuli although some subjects trained in relaxation techniques can maintain high alpha amplitudes even with their eyes open.

Beta: Beta rhythms occur in individuals who are alert and attentive to external stimuli or exert specific mental effort, or paradoxically, beta rhythms also occur during deep sleep, REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep when the eyes switch back and forth. This does not mean that there is less electrical activity, rather that the “positive” and “negative” activities are starting to counterbalance so that the sum of the electrical activity is less. Thus, instead of getting the wave-like synchronized pattern of alpha waves, desynchronization or alpha block occurs. So, the beta wave represents arousal of the cortex to a higher state of alertness or tension. It may also be associated with “remembering” or retrieving memories.

Delta and Theta: Delta and theta rhythms are low-frequency EEG patterns that increase during sleep in the normal adult.   As people move from lighter to deeper stages of sleep (prior to REM sleep), the occurrence of alpha waves diminish and is gradually replaced by the lower frequency theta and then delta frequency rhythms.

Although delta and theta rhythms are generally prominent during sleep, there are cases when delta and theta rhythms are recorded from individuals who are awake. For example, theta waves will occur for brief intervals during emotional responses to frustrating events or situations.   Delta waves may increase during difficult mental activities requiring concentration. In general, the occurrence and amplitudes of delta and theta rhythms are highly variable within and between individuals.

10 Reasons Smiling Benefits You!

Mother Teresa, one of my personal role models, once said “We shall never know all the good that a simple smile can do.” We have been smiling all our lives. And to some degree, we already possess the inherent knowledge that smiling not only feels good but it actually does good too.

Yet many of us shy from smiling as often as we ought to. I’m not the one to judge; we all have our own issues in life. But way too often, we actually punish ourselves by choosing not to smile when we really should be smiling our brains off!

So, the next time you get the opportunity to smile, just smile, and enjoy all that positivity it spawns. If you’re not convinced, well here below are reasons you should be.

1. Smiling makes you look attractive.

Your smile tells a great deal about you. It really is true. Not convinced? Try this. Try to think of some of the people you’re attracted to. Done? How many of those were actually smiling? Well, you don’t have to tell me because I already know the answer.

We are naturally hardwired to be attracted to people who smile. Something about seeing someone smile builds up all this positive energy in our minds. And every time we see them, we associate them with all that positive energy.

So, the next time you’re around a bunch of friends or strangers (it really doesn’t matter) and you want to attract attention, just smile.

2. Smiling makes you happier.

Now this is as true as it is strange. Smiling actually makes you, the person smiling, happier regardless of the situation. Normally we are hardwired to smile only during pleasant situations.

The brain in turn releases endorphins which lowers stress and improves your overall mood, hence making the situation pleasant. But it being a voluntary action, we can actually trick the brain into believing that an otherwise dull situation is actually pleasant by simply smiling.

So the next time you’re bored, or god forbid sad, try this — kick back, take a few deep breaths and smile. Just smile, and watch your brain work its magic!

3. Smiling improves your immune system.

It has been reported that when you’re smiling, the body releases more white blood cells than it usually does. And the prime purpose of white blood cells are to protect the body against both infectious diseases and foreign invaders.

So, smiling more often actually makes your body more immune to diseases and hence makes you healthier. In fact, that is the prime reason why so many famous celebrities are invited to children’s hospitals. If they can get the children to smile, that will, to some degree, boost their overall health.

So with this in mind, don’t just go smiling on your own from now on. Make others smile too!

4. Smiling makes you a better leader.

Smiling encourages trust. We can all agree to that. A person who is constantly smiling appears more trustful than someone who is not. And what more do we look for in a great leader than trust?

Take a look at all the popular leaders of the world. I don’t say the great leaders, because not all of them may be popular. But the popular ones, who are also the more successful, smile more often than others.

This is true for leadership in all levels. Fear and intimidation may work like a charm for a while, but they never last long. The leaders who truly make a mark in history are the ones that smile.

5. Smiling helps you make a better impression.

Have you ever been in a room with strangers and struggled to socialize to the extent you wish you could? Wouldn’t you in turn want to be that person who can get along with everyone in the room in a jiffy?

Well, if you look at the people who can actually do this, you will find that the key to their success is, you guessed it, smiling. Yes, they’re smiling more than you are. But guess what? Their personality is no match for yours. Put on more smiles, and you’ll be sweeping all the charm towards your direction in no time!

6. Smiling makes you more productive.

We talked about the value of smiling as a mood booster earlier, but it doesn’t end there. The effect of one good smile follows you to your workplace and in fact, helps improve your overall performance there.

And this is actually backed by research. A 2010 research led by Andrew Oswald, a Professor of Economics at Warwick Business School, proved that employees who smile more often are significantly more productive and creative in the workplace.

So whether you’re an employee or an employer, smile more often and make others around you smile more often too. It will be great for everyone involved.

7. Smiling makes you more approachable.

Imagine yourself in a room with two people you’ve never met before. You need toask them a favor.  And it’s not just any favor. It would actually be of mutual benefit. Both persons are on their phones. One is smiling, the other is not.

After a while, they put their phones down, and you’re ready to approach them. Which of the two would you go to, or at least go to first? Once again, I know the answer.

There is something about smiling that attracts trust. It makes the person wearing the smile appear warm and kind. The very qualities that make one approachable.

8. Smiling makes you more confident.

Not only does smiling make you look more confident, it actually makes you confident in the long term. If you’re someone who smiles often, you tend to attract more attention, trust and respect than others around you.

This in turn makes you look for the attention, trust and respect in every situation which is the hallmark of confidence — believing that you deserve something.

And how do you do that? The only way you’ve ever known. Smiling more! Which in turn makes you even more confident. It is almost like a chain reaction. A never ending cycle that only makes you more confident and happier with every iteration.

9. Smiles are contagious.

Well, they are, aren’t they?  How many times have you seen someone smile and get no reaction from the other party? Very few, right? People smile, even if to be polite. And we’ve talked about the seer effect of just smiling, even in pretense.

When you’re smiling, you’re actually asking the other party to join in on the fun with you. And 99 percent of the time, they do join you. Smiles are one of the most contagious things in the world, behind probably only to laughter, which is in a way just a louder smile. So smile more, and spread the joy!

10. Smiles are free.

We have discussed a lot of benefits of smiling. But we are yet to discuss the most important reason you should smile more often –- because they’re free! When was the last time you blew away something so beneficial yet absolutely free? Smile, just smile.

You’ll be happier and you’ll make everyone around you feel better.  Dale Carnegie wrote this on his book “How to Win Friends and Influence People”: “A smile costs nothing, but creates much. It enriches those who receive, without impoverishing those who give. It happens in a flash and the memory of it sometimes lasts forever.” Old Carnegie sure was onto something!

This article is credited to Lifehack.  Loved it so much I have posted it to share with you.

Neurons that fire together…

Neurons that Fire Together Wire Together

  What does THAT mean for you? How can you retrain your brain cells to work more in your favor towards happiness and ease?

 In 2013 Dr. Thomas Sudhof won the Nobel Prize in Medicine for the discovery of synaptic transmission–how brain cells communicate via chemicals. He credits his childhood Bassoon teacher with being his most influential teacher. Think about THAT! He currently works in the School for Medicine at Stanford. He is Professor of Molecular & Cellular Neurology, Psychiatry and Physiology.  Pretty impressive CV.

Our brain cells communicate with one another via synaptic transmission–one brain cell releases a chemical (neurotransmitter) that the next brain cell absorbs.  This communication process is known as “neuronal firing.”  When brain cells communicate frequently, the connection between them strengthens.  Messages that travel the same pathway in the brain over & over begin to transmit faster & faster.  With enough repetition, they become automatic.  That’s why we practice things like hitting a golf ball–with enough practice, we can go on automatic pilot.

Psychologists have long known that negative thought processes follow this same pattern–the more we think about, or “ruminate,” on a negative thought, the more entrenched the thought becomes.  Negative and traumatic thoughts also tend to “loop”–they play themselves over and over until we do something consciously to stop them.

The more these negative thoughts loop, the stronger the neural pathways become, and the more difficult it becomes to stop them!  This is why thoughts that cause depression, anxiety, panic, obsessions, and compulsions can become so difficult to combat.  And along the way, these thoughts stir up emotional as well as physiological reactions.

Psychotherapy, regardless of the orientation, attempts to stop this process. Neurofeedback gets to the heart of the issue. A brain map can identify where there are too many or too few synapses firing and give you real time information on how to either quiet or encourage firing in specific regions of the brain so that you can have a better operating system.

Come by for a free demonstration at Brain Training of New England to learn more about your brain -your command central.