Veteran’s Special

Brain Training of New England Veterans.jpg

In honor of all our Veteran’s, their hard work and devotion to our country, I’m offering a discount on brain training services.  Suffering from head trauma?  PTSD?  Headaches or nightmares?  Sleep or temper problems?  Neurofeedback is an evidence-based practice that heals the problem from the inside out.  Get your life back on track.

Click on the “Schedule Now” button.  Schedule a series of 10 sessions of Neurofeedback and you’ll get a big discount.  I’ll work with you to make this affordable and give you a fast track to feeling better.  Looking forward being part of your healing team.

The Brain Lady,

Pam

Advertisements

Parietal lobes

Parietal lobe.jpgCan you read and write? Do math? Put on your shoes? Read a map? Apply lipstick or know when someone is unhappy? Catch a ball?

If so, thank your Parietal lobes!!!

  • The parietal lobe is complex in that there is a dominant hemisphere and a non-dominant hemisphere. The parietal lobe controls abilities such as math calculation, writing, left-right orientation, and finger recognition. Lesions in part of the parietal lobe can cause deficits in writing, arithmetic calculation, left-right disorientation, and finger-naming (Gerstmann syndrome).
  • The nondominant parietal lobe controls the opposite side of the body enabling you to be aware of environmental space, and is important for abilities such as drawing, being aware of expression, body language and facial recognition. If you can recognize feelings on someone’s face, be grateful to your parietal lobe near the temporal lobe. .An acute injury to the nondominant parietal lobe may cause neglect of the contralateral side (usually the left), resulting in decreased awareness of that part of the body, its environment, and any associated injury to that side (anosognosia). For example, patients with large right parietal lesions may deny the existence of left-sided paralysis. Patients with smaller lesions may lose the ability to do learned motor tasks (eg, dressing, other well-learned activities)—a spatial-manual deficit called apraxia.

Parietal lobe functions include:

  • Cognition
  • Information Processing
  • Touch Sensation (Pain, Temperature, etc.)
  • Understanding Spatial Orientation
  • Movement Coordination
  • Speech
  • Visual Perception
  • Reading and Writing
  • Mathematical Computation

Training with Neurofeedback can assist the brain in making new pathways and support the brain in rewiring itself. Schedule your free demo today to learn more about how Neurofeedback can bring you to a higher state of awareness and function. For the first time in history, we can see our own brains at work and assist its functioning to a higher state of optimization.

I look forward to working with you!

Occipital Lobe

In general, the average human brain weighs about 1,400 grams (3 lb). The brain looks like a large pinkish-gray walnut. The brain can be divided down the middle lengthwise into two halves called the cerebral hemispheres. Each cerebral hemisphere is divided into four lobes by sulci and gyri. The sulci (or fissures) are the grooves and the gyri are the “bumps” that can be seen on the surface of the brain. The folding created by the sulci and gyri increases the amount of cerebral cortex that can fit in the skull. The total surface area of the cerebral cortex is about 324 square inches or about the size of a full page of newspaper. Each person has a unique pattern of gyri and sulci, much like a fingerprintoccipital lobe.

The third lobe of the brain for this series is the occiptal lobe which is located at the back of your head. It is where visual input in the brain is translated into information of what your eyes are seeing, and also to being able to understand what we read.

Similar to how the temporal lobe makes sense of auditory information, the occipital lobe makes sense of visual information so that we are able to understand it. If our occipital lobe is impaired, or injured we would not be able to correctly process visual signals, thus visual confusion would result. We might, for example, see an image chopped up or parts missing. Also, with back of the head injuries, our ability to get into a restorative sleep called REM sleep is often impaired.

Occipital lobe epilepsy accounts for about 5-10 of all epilepsy. An occipital lobe epilepsy may be triggered by a strobe light show since the origin is in the visual processing component of the brain.